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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
, six teachers and educators were taken from us at gun point. an act of senseless and incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families, of our schools, of our communities across the country. earlier this month shortly after newtown, all members of congress took an oath to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility. today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of gun violence in our society to enact, to ensure the safety and security of our communities. under the leadership of congressman thomson, mike thompson, our gun violence prevention task force keeps growing in number. our colleagues are submitting recommendations for legislation, the task force is working with outside organizations, and sharing the latest information on gun violence and steps we can take and must take to end it. today to strengthen the efforts of this task force and our democratic caucus, we will hear from americans with personal and professional experiences with
families, our neighbors, are own with education. this is a promise lives lost. to be open to all possibilities. there is no agenda other than to make our community a safer and better place. this is a promise. to have a conversation on all the issues. conversations where listening is as important as speaking. conversations were even those with the most opposing views can debate and goodwill. this is a promise. to turn the conversations to action things must change. this is a time. this is a promise. we make to our precious children because each human life is filled with promise and we continue to be filled with unbearable pain; we choose love, belief, hope instead of anger. this is a promise. to make everything in our part not as a place with victims but a place where real change can be made. our hearts are broken. our spirits are not. this is a promise. as a parent i have never had anything hit so close to home as it did the other day. the second item is a hearing at a different vein to discuss and have it public and open dialogue about the cleanliness of our streets and open sp
's not just about dealing with the fiscal crisis. it's about education, research and development, controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation, and we can't just do one piece of it. >> roughly 24 hours from now we will hear the president lay out some of those plans for the course of the next four years. david playofoffe, the president completed writing his remarks. now we just wait to hear what he has to say. >> and there were other active tifs involving the vice president. he was sworn in for a second time today. tell us about that. >> that took place about 8:20 this morning. he was sworn in by his choosing by the justice sonia sotomayor. a lot of people were asking why did that happen roughly 8:00 this morning. because the justice is actually on book tour right now. she had a previous commitment in new york. she had to hustle to a train to make that commitment in new york city today. so it took place early this morning. vice president joe biden surrounded by his family over at the naval observatory, his residence, for the swearing-in. only a matter of hours ago today
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
. there was the brown versus board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student who led a walkout of the segregated schools to protest against the inferior education. that's in 1951. many people we don't even know their names oregon before rosa parks in montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. so this resistance largely among young people. >> host: always among the young. >> guest: when we talk about south africa it was the students and saleh though. we all remember nelson mandela. nelson mandela was in a prison. it was the students stephen eco-who revived a movement in the early 70's and late 60's. >> host: there was james sybil talking about children the young people leading the way. he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and for dr. king. tell the story about the children's movement. >> guest: again, king was at a crucial point. we have the image the king gave the direction and he had a margin people across the country followed him. that is wrong. from mont
of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are adults that are looking to get arrested had already been
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
with the message on education, which i know you care about? >> i'm really excited about the next four years. there's a lot we can do in terms of encouraging kids and changing inner cities forever, really. by encouraging these kids to be entrepreneurs and scientists. that's where i'm putting all of my focus on. >> what else do you think his priorities should be in the next four years? if you have to choose a few, he can't go through everything he wants to do. >> jobs in america, you know, around consumer electronics. next year, consumer electronics will make $200 billion, and i would like to see those $200 billion, you know, a lot of that money here in america. >> do you think so many jobs from big companies are being outsourced at the moment? apples and company like that, they spend too much abroad? >> i think they spend pretty much everything abroad when it comes to manufacturing. we have to educate our kids and educate america. you know, so they have no excuse. the excuse is, the skillset isn't here in america. so if we get these american citizens and these kids a skill set, you know, hopefully
. we think that is very important at the brady center. we're involved in public education campaigns to educate people about the risks of guns and educate clinicians' about what they should know and to educate the public about what they can do to prevent gun crimes before they happen. there are a lot of sensible proposals that we can do to get at all aspects of this complex problem. host: this tweet from bill badey. is there a definition for that? guest: i think he means a gun show sell. that is not going to be relevant for the current debate. we have gone past that. people talked about closing the gun show loophole. the problem with that is that it is still left open internet sales and sales in the parking lot of those shows. we have gone past that. it will not be of little significance if we can require background checks on all gun sales. it will close the classified ad loopholes and all gun sales under one place. it is similar if we sold controlled substances where you would say the law requires you to get a prescription from a doctor and go to a pharmacy to buy drugs except when
-- education, health programs -- all over the world to help children and make them healthier. >> every year in greenwich, connecticut, members of the teen council of save the children put on their running shoes and roll up their sleeves. >> the teens volunteer, and they help along the road, and the teens also run the race. and they help some of the younger children run, as well, and they encourage. and some of the teens are here cheerleading. >> the teens say they volunteer to help out because they appreciate how lucky they are to live in america. >> we've all been given opportunities that a lot of kids around the world have not been, and i think i'd be remiss if i were to sort of squander that opportunity, to not help others achieve the same potential and get the same opportunities that i've been given. >> i'm here today to support save the children in its mini marathon. it's a great cause, and i love doing it. >> the course is a 2 1/2-mile run through a local park. the event is open to people of all ages. and it's okay if you walk. what's important is supporting a good cause. save the chi
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
, culture, art, and education. their patriotism is quiet, but deep. their values sustain our national life. now, i have used the words "they'' and "their'' in speaking of these heroes. i could say "you'' and "your,'' because i'm addressing the heroes of whom i speak -- you, the citizens of this blessed land. your dreams, your hopes, your goals are going to be the dreams, the hopes, and the goals of this administration, so help me god. we shall reflect the compassion that is so much a part of your makeup. how can we love our country and not love our countrymen, and loving them, reach out a hand when they fall, heal them when they're sick, and provide opportunity to make them self- sufficient so they will be equal in fact and not just in theory? can we solve the problems confronting us? well, the answer is an unequivocal and emphatic "yes.'' to paraphrase winston churchill, i did not take the oath i've just taken with the intention of presiding over the dissolution of the world's strongest economy. in the days ahead i will propose removing the roadblocks that have slowed our economy and redu
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
the print-outs of webmd -- >> that's me. >> google the symptoms. i think that's good. good to be educated and know what's going on and you also do face the risk of having too much. this overload. >> right. >> and so that's why it's important to practice your pitch. just like if you were -- if you have ten seconds to talk to your senator, or your boss, i mean, you would want to make sure that you really practice that pitch and so that's why it's so important to write down the key aspects of your story. >> wow. >> and rehearse it in advance. >> lots of pressure here. >> my cysister, is an er doctor and told me that history taking is an art form and done in a proper way. so how can doctors get better at it? i mean, we have the patient who is come in with the webmd stuff, we have patient who is want to talk to you for an hour. a lot of doctors are egotistical as my sister's were. is it on the doctor to get better at the art form or is it on patients to really learn how to tell their story? >> ideally, the doctor should get better. we all want better doctors and i think that as an educator mys
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
of education decision in 1954. strom thurmond is the record holder to this day of the longest one-man filibuster. at it in the guinness book of record wards, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against then 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond as one know last of the jim crow demagogues. but what we forget about thurmond, he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what die mean by -- what do i mean? the sun belt -- it's one of the major stories in the history of 20 until century american politics, and that is the flow of jobs, of industries, of resources and populations, from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and southwest,, in the post world wr ii period. southern states were recruiting industries, passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so, states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona, north carolina, a
of research, education, and policy. >> when you look at what has been done in the past, it has not thought of as very far. we have to do something different. we believe a national discussion, putting aside preconceived notions will have us move forward as a nation. >> appearing with the sandy hook promise, connecticut senator chris murphy predicted a defeat of nra efforts to block the approval of a new assault weapons ban. >> his job to say no gun control and has congress, but they are wrong. they will see they are wrong as this president brings the full weight of his office to the house and senate and as republicans and democrats grievously have pledged to the nra start turning a different direction. i think today is an important day because it gives a clear forum for people across newtown, across the state, and across this nation and lecturer -- clear the status quo is not ok when it comes to the laws on guns in this country. >> new figures show u.s. military suicides broke another all-time record last year. 349 active duty soldiers took their own lives in 2012, far exceeding the number
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
administration. making the transportation department work with the education department, work with the e.p.a., sustainable communicates, promised neighborhoods. to invest in brain power and education, and also lift up neighborhoods at the same time. and to his credit, he's been more collabrative with mayors, i think than we've seen in a long time. so i have a lot of hope for the second term. >> mayor castro of san antonio, texas, and brother joaquin castro in congress, very kind of you to spend a moment with us. >> great to be here. >> the president will be leaving the capitol shortly. he'll go out the east front where members of the u.s. military have been assembled so that we can symbolically review the troops. and we have leon panetta joining us now from inside the capitol. can you hear us, second panetta? >> i can, good to talk to you. >> nice to talk to you, mr. secretary. >> i don't three weeks ago any americans would have thought that north africa would be at the top of the security concerns. we've heard three americans were killed in that hostage situation in algeria and seven am
read your articles every day for the past year or two. you have vegetated me. -- educated me. a lot of things i have heard that have come out of the republican or conservative talk show hosts that criticize obama -- after reading your article, i found out that what -- right here on the rush limbaugh show was a lie. the whole situation, i found out the true fact by readin gyour article in our local paper. the whole true thing -- the whole solydnra thing started with the bush adminstration. the fast a furious thing. host:let's go to bill for a response. guest:thanks for the kind words. i am glad you are reading them we are trying to get our work out in different ways. we have partnershuips with newspapers. they use the truth-o-meter. i am glad you are readin gour work and their work and happy our word is getting out. host: our caller but up solyndra, looking at the president's promises regarding energy. guest: a lot of that was included in the stimulus bill. a big grab bag, $77 billion of goodies that included many things foraenergy and the environment. i know that a lot were include
-meaning, gracious man. he's an educated man as well, a cultured man. c-span: is it hard for a reporter to cover a story or an individual when they don't agree with them and be fair? >> guest: you see, i'm one of these people who doesn't say that objectivity is not within our reach. i think if you're a pro and you're a reporter, you do it. whether you agree with the guy or not is just quite incidental it doesn't count at all really. c-span: what did you leave out of this book? >> guest: what did i leave out? a hundred pages that they made me edit out. it was a hundred pages longer, and you probably want to know what was in those hundred pages. c-span: in about a half of minute. >> guest: oh dear! that's a hard one. i think there was probably a lot more on the release of the pueblo crew, more about covering affairs in europe and in the middle east. there was certainly more about my father that unfortunately i had to cut, and more about the history of new haven and the italian migration and that kind of thing. c-span: what's the next book about? >> guest: i don't know. i think it's going to be abo
happening again, i thought that the public itself needed to engage more on financial reform, educate themselves better. i tried very hard to make the book accessible. i hope people will look and take it seriously. >> on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns" tonight on c-span's q&a. >> after that, president obama and by its -- and vice president biden had a wreath-laying and president obama took the oath at the white house. here is a look at the events today. vice president of the united states, accompanied by justice sonia sotomayor. [applause] >> the vice president has asked for -- ask that we bless the occasion with prayer. so, let us pray. the profit micah reclaims did you have been told, mortal, what is good, and what the board requires a view, only to do justice and love goodness, walking calmly with your dog. -- god. gracious god, we ask your blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews the pledge he made to his country. in all the complexities that, this world, give us your wisdom so that he ca
, well-educated, has his wife, coretta, and for children caught the young guest who were quite young, the youngest boreman 63, born in birmingham. so dexter irca the youngest is just an infant during this period. this is a period when dr. king is most political, in the sense that in the early your workout in the parting of the waters come he's getting drawn into other people's movements because he's an orator, and he would go help out. the bus boycott wasn't his idea. the freedom rides and the sit-ins certainly weren't his idea to give he would get called in to these meetings. but by 1963 where we start here, he's right and that the south is hardened against segregation and that the moment in history might fit without implementing something into history that will resist that recession, that retrograde trend. and he takes a huge risk to the he says i'm going to have my own movement. i'm going to risk everything. first in birmingham to try to crack segregation and then later in selma, where we ending 65, after the long year of 64 where he is lobbying and submitting to jail when st. aug
much he's learned. he's had the ultimate washington education so we see two changes in him. one is the philosophical change we've been talking about. this is the president who didn't always say what he really thought in the first term. when there were terrible storms that leveled parts of missouri he flew down there and he gave consoling speeches in which he talked about thosetorms as acts god which really angered some of the climate advocates because they said how can you talk about this like an act of god when we believe that this is linked to climate change and we can do something about it? gun control. this is a president who did very little on gun control in his first term and within hours of the newtown shooting you could see how that changed. he came out and made that first statement and you said to yourself this is a president who's going to try to do something about gun control. the second questn isow much smarter he's gotten about the washington maneuvering. the white house did do a better job at playing out the recent series of debt and budget negotiations. the quest
that will make the next counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is d
in education and research and development, innovation. to get control of the energy future. all of that will be a part of the president's vision for the next four years. >> you know, bob schieffer mentioned earlier this morning the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, the president is proposing a number of changes to the gun laws in this country. how much a part of the president's resolve will that be in the months coming? >> well, the thing -- the president always said that, you know, you have to do many things at once when you're president, and that's a very important thing. we can't keep replicating these tragedies and it's not just the big tragedies, but the small, smaller strategy dtragedies than the streets every day. so he's determined to move forward on this package of laws. they're not the only things we need to do. some of the things have less to do with government and more to do with what we -- what we do in our home. what our children play and in terms of video games and what they watch. but certainly we need to do something about guns. we are hopeful that we're at a mom
and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when he recreate himself as a political been, so when you think about it we are all sort of created from a lot of different strengths but i can't think of anybody with a more fascinating mix them obama. >> host: tell us about the team here. >> i can't tell you how happy i am about the people in working with. i don't know swahili which is the mother tongue of this part of kenya and most people speak english, they all don't and the drive on the other side of the road and i would have been dead if i tried to drive myself plus there are no road signs. the places we've, i couldn't find in a million years and i'm pretty good at finding things, so i definitely needed a great driver and we got one. he is a friend and interested in politics. i needed somebody on the ground to help set up interviews and the national archives and elsewhere. i looked out and got ken who is 40-years-old, investigative journalist and kenya, very tough, straightforward, smart,
as a nation, who value education, who value understanding situations who say we want to change this dynamic, the very first thing we want to start with is gathering data. >> stephanie: right. it doesn't take a rocket scientist so know that they don't want us to study that because it will prove our point. >> that's right. the first years in this man's senate was when they were lobbying against car safety. and when the data was gathered the nation said oh my glory, we can make safer cars than this. >> stephanie: yeah we used to scream about you can't make me wear a seat belt and it's yeah well, we can because you are killing people. it is the same sort of thing isn't it? >> exactly. >> stephanie: sister it's such an honor and a pleasure. >> i'm glad it worked out. >> stephanie: thank you so much, and continue your great work. >> we'll keep at it. [ applause ] >> stephanie: i love her. oh my glory, that's my new catch phrase. you are going to have to fight me for it john fugelsang. all right. we'll be right back on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: finally talk radio yo
to go for a story like this. it couldn't be more educational because we're making quilts and we're talking about our military service members, about our country, about our history. so it's the epitome of what is special about public television. >> you make public television special with your pledges of support at the number you see on your screen. let's find out more about the thank you gifts we'll send. >> i'm jennifer konfrst. i'm glad you're here enjoying this program on this station. i want to let you know about the thank you gifts we have, the ways we have of thanking you for investing in quality programming just like this that stays right here in your community. if you can call and pledge a dollar a day to this station we would be happy to send you a great combination gift that includes everything you need to enjoy and implement the quilts of valor ideals. so if you see that $365 level, you'll receive labels that you can sew on your quilts. one is for groups and one is for individual. you'll also receive a dvd of the program you've been enjoying and will
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)